Giving your children allowance may give them a sense of entitlement

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Entitlement: belief that one is deserving of or entitled to certain privileges

Child at work in Sandakphu, doing some houshol...
Child at work in Sandakphu, doing some houshold chores. Français : Enfant au travail à Sandakphu, effectuant des tâches ménagères. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When was the last time you were paid for just existing? It’s been so long that you have no recollection of the memory. Exactly? So why are more parents offering their children allowance during these tough economic times?

After speaking with multiple parents one statement stood out over the others.

“I don’t want my child to feel bad when I can’t afford to purchase her what she wants.” ~Anonymous Mother

Well mother, life will not be able to provide everything your daughter wants. In fact, she may have more difficult times than good. Not to say, that she won’t become a diamond in the rough, but even a diamond begins its life as a lump of coal that goes through trials before it begins to have a shimmer of sparkle. In addition, there’s clarity and brilliance.

When you don’t allow your child to grow you stump that clarity and brilliance.

While figuring an allowance it’s prudent to contemplate which chores can be attached to receiving money. Yes, you want to make sure that your child knows that in order to receive you must be willing to give. Too often parents are creating entitlement within their children without knowing.

We’ve seen it over and over.

Ways to know that a child has grown to become an adult with entitlement:

  • S/he wants a raise without producing any hard work, creative ideas, teamwork or respect.
  • S/he feels that an ‘A’ is deserving in class although the assignments weren’t complete and attendance was less than acceptable.
  • S/he should be granted every heart’s desire because s/he asked for it.
  • S/he has never had to work because parents have always provided.
  • S/he doesn’t know the value of money because parents never showed her/her the meaning.

If you can afford disbursing an allowance then congratulations! But it should not be at the expense of guilt. The mother who mentioned that she didn’t want her daughter to feel bad about not receiving a gift is understandable; you should also begin to teach your child that you won’t be able to receive everything you ask for if you aren’t willing to sacrifice.

Children with entitlement grow to become children with debt. If you have never been taught the value of money, its power and how to manage you will spend uncontrollably.

Many adults purchase extravagant homes, vehicles and jewelry while never acknowledging how much it will possibly push them into debt if you don’t spend within your limit.

Now is the time to create a well-informed child who is knowledgeable about work, responsibility and money.

Parents, here are some suggestions to teach your children about money.

  • Create a list for your children to know which chores are available.
  • Document how much each chore is worth and how much they’ve earned each week.
  • Save 15% of the money earned while discussing w/ your children the reason for an emergency fund.
  • While shopping for items give your children a budget so that they don’t spend every penny in their pocket.
  • If their attitude is negative then they aren’t able to earn money for the week (probation).

It’s feasible for responsible children to become responsible adults. Don’t just give them money, teach them ways to earn and manage money.

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“Love yourself enough to support yourself.”

© SMG, LLC

About Bahiyah Shabazz 1003 Articles
Bahiyah Shabazz is one of the nation’s leading financial experts on the art of maximizing your growth. She's a wealth building expert, author, speaker, financial advocate, magazine and online columnist.

1 Comment on Giving your children allowance may give them a sense of entitlement

  1. I can see how giving money relates to entitlement. I remember watching a student argue with a teacher about his grade. The student couldn’t understand why he was receiving a D. His argument was I tried and came to class.

    If I recall the student was known for high tech gadgets and name brand clothes that his parents bought him because he decided to go to college.

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